Woman in court over cannabis infused edibles

These baked goods infused with cannabis oil were among those seized during a search warrant in Hamilton. Photo: NZ Police.

A Hamilton woman has appeared in court for allegedly producing and supplying cannabis infused gummy lollies, baked goods and brownies that were sold on social media.

Jolee Helieta Kora, 27, appeared before a registrar in Hamilton District Court on Wednesday where she entered no plea and was further remanded on bail.

The Hamilton woman is facing six charges including possession of cannabis infused edible products, namely gummy bears and brownies, supplying class B drugs in the form of cannabis infused chocolate brownie and lollies, producing cannabis infused butter and coconut oil and offering to supply cannabis infused edible products.

The charges relate to incidents that took place between September 2019 and June this year.

On June 5, police executed a search warrant which they said uncovered a large quantity of cannabis infused butter and a significant quantity of cannabis infused products including gummy and jelly lollies, moulded chocolates, muffins, cookies and brownies.

"Our investigation identified that these products were being marketed and sold online via Instagram and Facebook and through a website using the alias 'Dolly's Edibles'," says Detective Inspector Graham Pitkethley.

The seizure came at the termination of Operation Casper - a Waikato police investigation into the production and distribution of cannabis edibles sold online.

"The search warrant on Friday, June 5, discovered the production of a large quantity of cannabis infused butter and a significant quantity of cannabis infused products including gummy and jelly lollies, moulded chocolates, muffins, cookies and brownies."

Graham says the method of selling via social media platforms allows people of all ages, including children and young people, to easily purchase and obtain these products.

Many of these baked goods and gummy lollies had the appearance of normal baked products and confectionery.

"It's important for our communities to recognise the forms these products can take and how they are distributed to help us lessen the risk of children consuming them.

"It's equally important for parents and caregivers to be aware that young people are able to purchase these products via a range of social media platforms."

Graham says the psychoactive effects from eating cannabis products will be widely variable depending on the individual.

-Additional reporting by Stuff/Phillipa Yalden.

Subscribe to our daily Newsletter

Email:


You may also like...

0 Comments

There are no comments on this article.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to make a comment. Login Now